This Week's Training Topic

Keeping Prospects Safe - 75% Nurturing Parent Ego State

Keeping Prospects Safe

June 10, 20242 min read

75% Nurturing Parent; 25% Adult Ego State; 0% Child

The Secret Weapon in Sales: Making Prospects Feel Safe (According to Transactional Analysis)

Imagine your prospect as a nervous first-grader entering a new classroom. They're looking for someone they can trust, someone who will guide them and make them feel comfortable. That's you!

In sales, psychology plays a big role. Transactional Analysis (TA), a theory developed by Eric Berne [Berne, 1961], suggests people buy emotionally first, then justify it with logic. So, creating a safe space for your prospect, fostering a positive emotional connection, is crucial for closing deals.

Here's the key, using the TA framework:

  • Be Their Nurturing Parent (75%) : Think Berne's Nurturing Parent ego state [Berne, 1961]. Ask questions, actively listen, and focus on understanding their needs. You're there to help them explore solutions, not pressure them into a decision (which would be a Controlling Parent state).

  • Provide Clarity (25%) : Once you understand their needs, share relevant information in a clear and concise way, acting from your Adult ego state [Berne, 1961]. Help them see how your product or service solves their problem, bridging the gap between their emotional needs and the logical solution.

  • Leave Your Ego at the Door (0%) : Nobody likes a know-it-all or someone who makes them feel inferior, which would be a Controlling Parent or Critical Child ego state [Berne, 1961]. Avoid being overly critical or boastful.

Remember, people want to do business with and will ONLY refer to those they trust. By creating a safe and supportive environment, you build trust and rapport, making them more likely to say "yes."

Think about it this way: Would you buy from someone who makes you feel nervous or unsure? Probably not. But a friendly guide who takes the time to understand you? That's a different story.

Citations

  • Berne, E. (1961). Transactional analysis in psychotherapy. Grove Press.

blog author image

Robert Johnson

Founder of Bold Networking, BoldOS Sales Training, and Top Producer Intensive

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Training Topic Library

Keeping Prospects Safe - 75% Nurturing Parent Ego State

Keeping Prospects Safe

June 10, 20242 min read

75% Nurturing Parent; 25% Adult Ego State; 0% Child

The Secret Weapon in Sales: Making Prospects Feel Safe (According to Transactional Analysis)

Imagine your prospect as a nervous first-grader entering a new classroom. They're looking for someone they can trust, someone who will guide them and make them feel comfortable. That's you!

In sales, psychology plays a big role. Transactional Analysis (TA), a theory developed by Eric Berne [Berne, 1961], suggests people buy emotionally first, then justify it with logic. So, creating a safe space for your prospect, fostering a positive emotional connection, is crucial for closing deals.

Here's the key, using the TA framework:

  • Be Their Nurturing Parent (75%) : Think Berne's Nurturing Parent ego state [Berne, 1961]. Ask questions, actively listen, and focus on understanding their needs. You're there to help them explore solutions, not pressure them into a decision (which would be a Controlling Parent state).

  • Provide Clarity (25%) : Once you understand their needs, share relevant information in a clear and concise way, acting from your Adult ego state [Berne, 1961]. Help them see how your product or service solves their problem, bridging the gap between their emotional needs and the logical solution.

  • Leave Your Ego at the Door (0%) : Nobody likes a know-it-all or someone who makes them feel inferior, which would be a Controlling Parent or Critical Child ego state [Berne, 1961]. Avoid being overly critical or boastful.

Remember, people want to do business with and will ONLY refer to those they trust. By creating a safe and supportive environment, you build trust and rapport, making them more likely to say "yes."

Think about it this way: Would you buy from someone who makes you feel nervous or unsure? Probably not. But a friendly guide who takes the time to understand you? That's a different story.

Citations

  • Berne, E. (1961). Transactional analysis in psychotherapy. Grove Press.

blog author image

Robert Johnson

Founder of Bold Networking, BoldOS Sales Training, and Top Producer Intensive

Back to Blog

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